Neuronavigation guided Endoscopic endonasal removal of brain tumour

Neuronavigation guided Endoscopic endonasal removal of brain tumour

Now that I have my Neuronavigation (Brain GPS) and special endoscopes and my minimally invasive instruments thanks to SHIFA international and the staff for their kind support. I performed the first ever Neuronavigation guided Endoscopic endonasal( through the nose) resection of pituitary tumour. First for this half of Pakistan. This added as an extra tool to improve patient safety with maximal resection of tumour.

Redo Brain tumour surgery

Redo Brain tumour surgery

Last Month a patient came to see me having travelled half way across Pakistan.

They had been deteriorating for a few months due to a brain tumour, to the point that they became wheel chair bound.

The tumour had been operated previously but had recurred. It was causing a lot of pressure on the brain.

The patients family was in distress and losing faith in the medical profession.

I discussed with the patient and their family and we made the decision to re-operate and remove more tumour.

I saw the patient back in clinic a week ago. They were walking and much improved, though will need ongoing treatment under the oncology team.

Around 1 in 5 of my cases has been a redo-surgery. This includes pituitary, brain tumour and spinal cases. These cases are more challenging surgically, but can offer extended and improved quality of life for patients in the right circumstances.

I treat my patients as I would expect my family members to be treated. This is how I was trained and will always underpin my clinical practice.

Vestibular Schwanoma

Vestibular Schwanoma

Vestibular Schwanoma is a tumour in a very sensitive part of the brain.
It requires great skill to operate in this part of the brain because of important structures present in this area close to brain stem.One of a few neurosurgeons to offer surgery for this in the region. I operated on this patient who had presented with hearing loss, facial weakness and numbness and difficulty in walking. It takes skill to not just preserve, but improve the facial nerve and hearing in this operation. No title or accolade can match a happy patient with all symptoms improved.

Minimally invasive craniotomy for ICH

Minimally invasive craniotomy for ICH

I have been working to develop a Minimally Invasive Neurosurgical service at Shifa.

I recently performed a minimally invasive procedure for a common neurosurgical emergency e.g brain haemorrhage, which traditionally would have involved a large cut to the head and risked damage to part of the brain that is still working.

I, along with my team at SHIFA International developed a device that could be introduced via a small craniotomy and the clot could be removed via endoscopic approach.

The patient made a good recovery following the surgery. Thanks be to Allah.

I have also been able to use this technique for certain brain tumours with good results.

I believe in innovation and advancement in the best interest of the patient and will continue to provide the highest level of care in Pakistan, equal to that provided at any top ranking international institution in the world.

Endoscopic/Retractorless MVD for Trigeminal Neuralgia

Endoscopic/Retractorless MVD for Trigeminal Neuralgia

I am the only one in the country to offer retractorless/endoscopic microvascular decompression for trigeminal neuralgia and hemifacial spasm. These conditions cause considerable pain and functional difficulties. I find this operation to be challenging but also very gratifying. The feeling of seeing the patient pain free post op is something out of this world. So far I have had 100 percent success and I plan to keep it that way. Some images of the last case.

Wernicke’s Brain Tumour

Wernicke’s Brain Tumour

I have operated on some of the most complex brain tumour cases in Pakistan, including awake brain tumour surgery which I introduced in this region of Pakistan. This tumour was affecting Wernicke’s area, the speech area of the brain and causing a sensory dysphasia, meaning inability to understand what is being said. I removed well over 90% of this tumour, and more importantly the patient’s speech and understanding of speech has improved and is almost back to normal. Thanks be to Allah.